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Why you should be concerned about microplastics and 6 ways to avoid them

Research shows these tiny plastic particles are everywhere—even in the food we eat and the water that we drink. Here’s what you can do to avoid them.

How To Avoid Microplastics When Research Shows They’re Everywhere

These tiny plastics make up 94% of the infamous Great Pacific Garbage Patch, they’re being found in snow, and they seem to be literally everywhere else in between, including in both tap and bottled water that we drink every day and in many of the foods we eat. While the study of these tiny plastic particles is still an emerging field, understanding how are you can avoid exposure to microplastics may help protect your health in the long run.

According to Tapp Water, researchers say that microplastics are in as much as 94% of U.S. tap water, and 72% of tap water in Europe. Filtering your water can reduce your intake of microplastics, based on a review of various water filter brand specifications, ConsumerLab says. Most carbon block water filters can remove microplastics, and biodegradable coconut shell-based carbon block filters may also be effective, says Tapp Water.
1. Filter Your Tap Water According to Tapp Water, researchers say that microplastics are in as much as 94% of U.S. tap water, and 72% of tap water in Europe. Filtering your water can reduce your intake of microplastics, based on a review of various water filter brand specifications, ConsumerLab says. Most carbon block water filters can remove microplastics, and biodegradable coconut shell-based carbon block filters may also be effective, says Tapp Water. Source: Unsplash/JackDylag
Plastics take a long time to break down, and microplastics are a result of that process. By avoiding the use of plastic containers like water bottles whenever possible you can help keep plastics out of landfills and lessen your consumption.
2. Avoid Plastic Containers Plastics take a long time to break down, and microplastics are a result of that process. By avoiding the use of plastic containers like water bottles whenever possible you can help keep plastics out of landfills and lessen your consumption. Source: Unsplash/HadleyJin
Microbeads are small pieces of plastic added to some health and beauty products, such as toothpastes and facial scrubs. By limiting or avoiding products with microbeads, you can help discourage manufacturers from using them while reducing your own exposure to plastics.
3. Avoid Beauty Products With Microbeads Microbeads are small pieces of plastic added to some health and beauty products, such as toothpastes and facial scrubs. By limiting or avoiding products with microbeads, you can help discourage manufacturers from using them while reducing your own exposure to plastics. Source: Unsplash/SharonMcCutcheon
Studies show that washing and drying synthetic fibres may release over 700,000 microplastic fibres into the environment, The Guardian reported in 2016. The Plastics Pollution Coalition says that air drying clothes, or simply reducing their time in the dryer, can help cut back on microplastics produced by clothes washing.
4. Air Dry Your Clothes Studies show that washing and drying synthetic fibres may release over 700,000 microplastic fibres into the environment, The Guardian reported in 2016. The Plastics Pollution Coalition says that air drying clothes, or simply reducing their time in the dryer, can help cut back on microplastics produced by clothes washing. Source: Unsplash/ChristianFickinger
Researchers say that microplastics are eaten by marine life and some land animals, such as chicken, The Conversation writes. Since microplastics seem to be entering the food chain, limiting your consumption of meat and fish, if you can, may help reduce your exposure.
5. Try To Limit Eating Meat & Fish Researchers say that microplastics are eaten by marine life and some land animals, such as chicken, The Conversation writes. Since microplastics seem to be entering the food chain, limiting your consumption of meat and fish, if you can, may help reduce your exposure. Source: Unsplash/LouisHansel
Synthetic clothing fibers may significantly contribute to microplastics pollution, EcoWatch says. If you can, buying clothes made of natural fibers, such as cotton, can help. The Guppyfriend bag is also a potential solution, EcoWatch says. The Guppyfriend, collects the fibres that synthetic clothing sheds during washing, so that microplastics don’t end up down the drain.
6. Stick With Non-Synthetic Clothing Fibres Synthetic clothing fibers may significantly contribute to microplastics pollution, EcoWatch says. If you can, buying clothes made of natural fibers, such as cotton, can help. The Guppyfriend bag is also a potential solution, EcoWatch says. The Guppyfriend, collects the fibres that synthetic clothing sheds during washing, so that microplastics don’t end up down the drain. Source: Unsplash/PaulHanaoka

The disturbing discovery of micro plastics inside our bodies Source: YouTube/Neoscribe

Do your bit, from where you are, with what you can

While the issue of microplastics pollution worldwide can feel overwhelming, know that there are simple steps you can take to help reduce your exposure. Even if you can’t hit every item on your environmental hero to-do list, know that any effort you make to help lessen plastic consumption can make a difference.

Source: Bustle

Make an Impact

10 BITS OF PLASTIC YOU CAN QUIT TODAY

Here at Bright Vibes we are passionate about the environment, and we're keen to promote anything that can help improve the world we live in for ourselves and for future generations. Here are 10 suggestions of everyday plastic items we can all easily live without, and by quitting them we are doing our bit to reduce demand and production, further reducing the risk of more plastic finding its way into our oceans and food chain.