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UK Takeaways, restaurants and cafes set to be ‘banned’ from using sauce sachets

Source: Incountryvalueoman.net

Individually portioned single-use sachets containing condiments such as tomato ketchup and mayonnaise may soon be banned in the UK as part of new measures to cut down on difficult to recycle waste.

Sauce sachet ban to help squeeze out single-use plastics

Takeaways in the United Kingdom (UK) could soon be facing a sachet ban and will need to find eco-friendly alternatives to offer customers. Single-use packets of tomato ketchup, mayonnaise and vinegar – among others – could all be stamped out in a bid to cut down on plastic waste. Along with the sachets being banned, items such as plastic cutlery and plates may soon become unavailable.

Source: Unsplash/Hybrid

Takeaways Could Soon be facing Sauce Sachet Ban

Last year, UK Environment Secretary George Eustice said that the sachets ‘can cause considerable harm to the marine and terrestrial environment when disposed of incorrectly’. Sustainable sauce sachets is something that takeaway delivery service Just Eat has already trialled with sauces being given to customers in biodegradable seaweed packaging back in 2019. The move came after a survey found 92% wanted to see more of their takeaway sauces coming in the seaweed sachets, while 91% found them easy or easier to use than a normal sachet.

Source: LadBible

The report, by scientists at the University of Cadiz, found that ten types of item made up 75% of all ocean plastic, five of which were used for food or drink. Takeaway food containers and plastic cutlery made up 9% of all the litter sampled, while straws and stirrers represented 2.3%. Plastic bags and plastic bottles topped the list.
A study last summer found that waste from takeaway food and drink were the dominant items in global ocean plastic. The report, by scientists at the University of Cadiz, found that ten types of item made up 75% of all ocean plastic, five of which were used for food or drink. Takeaway food containers and plastic cutlery made up 9% of all the litter sampled, while straws and stirrers represented 2.3%. Plastic bags and plastic bottles topped the list. Source: NewFoodMagazine

Sachets are hard to segregate and clean, making them unlikely to be recycled

As reported by The Times, the plans, from the Department for Environment, Farming and Rural Affairs, are designed to cut down on plastic waste that cannot easily be recycled and which is likely to go into landfill or end up in the oceans. The ban would follow one on plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds, which were outlawed in most circumstances in 2020.

The government launched a call for evidence in November on how to tackle pollution from commonly littered single-use plastic items such as sachets, wet wipes and coffee cups. It said then that options included a ban and mandatory labelling to try to ensure they were disposed of correctly.

The report concluded that single-use sauce sachets could “cause considerable harm to the marine and terrestrial environment when disposed of incorrectly”. Because of their small size and heavy contamination with food, they are hard to segregate and clean, making them unlikely to be recycled.

Source: TheTimes

The ban would follow one on plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds, which were outlawed in most circumstances in 2020. Even the British Takeaway Campaign and the Federation of Small Businesses agreed that single-use plastics had to be reduced, provided businesses had time to find alternatives.
So long, sauce sachets! The ban would follow one on plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds, which were outlawed in most circumstances in 2020. Even the British Takeaway Campaign and the Federation of Small Businesses agreed that single-use plastics had to be reduced, provided businesses had time to find alternatives. Source: incountryvalueoman.net

alternatives to problematic sachets already exist

According to a report in The Times, a government source said on Tuesday 10 January that a ban on plastic sachets was being considered because “alternatives do exist and sachets are very problematic”.

The British Takeaway Campaign and the Federation of Small Businesses agreed that single-use plastics had to be reduced, provided businesses had time to find alternatives.

There have been some efforts to create plastic-free replacements for sauce and condiment packets. Notpla, a London-based startup, creates biodegradable sauce packets out of brown seaweed, which is fast-growing and abundantly available without requiring extensive resources to produce.

The firm’s packets have already been trialled at the London marathon, which in 2019 handed out packets of water and Lucozade to runners. Heinz has also partnered with the company to offer biodegradable ketchup packets.

Source: TheTimes 

Because of their small size and heavy contamination with food, the existing sachets are hard to segregate and clean, making them unlikely to be recycled.
Heinz has partnered with Notpla to offer biodegradable ketchup packets as an alternative to the problematic ones pictured. Because of their small size and heavy contamination with food, the existing sachets are hard to segregate and clean, making them unlikely to be recycled. Source: TheGate

The sachets aren’t wanted anyway

According to a One Poll survey of 2,000 UK adults, eight out of 10 people think the sachets should be banned in the UK. It is believed that bigger companies will be able to cope with the changes, but there are some concerns surrounding the smaller takeaways that might be impacted.

Speaking to LADbible, the British Takeaway Campaign highlighted some of the concerns with Deputy Chair, Andrew Crook, explaining: "It’s right that the nation reduces its plastic consumption, but we’ve got to do so without adding another costly burden on the smallest restaurants, many of which are struggling to keep their doors open. 

“Our favourite takeaways wouldn’t be the same without the sauces on the side, so the Government should give small restaurants time to find affordable, non-plastic alternatives, and not lumber them with other changes too soon either, like the proposed cutlery and polystyrene cup ban.”

What do you think? 

Source: LADbible 

Ooho and their other packaging solutions are made from Notpla, a revolutionary material made from seaweed and plants that biodegrades in weeks, naturally. ? They have created unique machines and materials to package products in the most sustainable way.
Notpla are a sustainable packaging start-up. Ooho and their other packaging solutions are made from Notpla, a revolutionary material made from seaweed and plants that biodegrades in weeks, naturally. ? They have created unique machines and materials to package products in the most sustainable way. Source: Notpla.com
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