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Organic rooftop farm above elementary school in China supplies canteen with fresh produce

Source: CCTV News via Inhabitat

A lush rooftop oasis atop an elementary school roof in Hangzhou, China is bringing kids closer to nature and healthy fresh food.

Hangzhou school rooftop garden helps pupils get green fingers and fresh veg.

A team led by Professor Li Bojun from the Zhejiang Province Agricultural Academy designed the Pujia Primary School’s expansive rooftop garden. The horseshoe landscape includes arable land, terraced paddy fields, and even a fruit orchard. All produce is grown organically without chemical pesticides. Food is picked daily from the rooftop and used in the school’s dining hall for the schoolchildren’s meals.

“This special garden was built with the primary school at the same time. The roof was designed in a specific way as to be able to support the weight capacity. It can bear 1,000 kg per square meter while ordinary apartment roofs only can hold 100 kg per square meter”, said Professor Li to CCTV News. In addition to providing fresh organic vegetables and fruits, the Pujia Primary School rooftop farm also serves as a layer of insulation that regulates temperatures and keeps the building cool in the summers and warm in winters. 

Source: Inhabitat 

Built by Pujia Primary School and a team from Zhejiang Province Agricultural Academy, the lush rooftop farm covers an area of more than 2,000 square meters and grows a variety of fresh vegetables, from pumpkins to pomegranates, all of which are free of chemical pesticides.
Pujia Primary School rooftop garden. Built by Pujia Primary School and a team from Zhejiang Province Agricultural Academy, the lush rooftop farm covers an area of more than 2,000 square meters and grows a variety of fresh vegetables, from pumpkins to pomegranates, all of which are free of chemical pesticides. Source: CCTV NEWS / Inhabitat.com
A team led by Professor Li Bojun from the Zhejiang Province Agricultural Academy designed the Pujia Primary School’s expansive rooftop garden. Source: CCTV News / Inhabitat.com
Food is picked daily from the rooftop and used in the school’s dining hall for the schoolchildren’s meals. Source: CCTV NEWS / Inhabitat.com
The roof was designed in a specific way as to be able to support the weight capacity. It can bear 1,000 kg per square meter while ordinary apartment roofs only can hold 100 kg per square meter”, Professor Li told CCTV News.
“This special garden was built with the primary school at the same time… The roof was designed in a specific way as to be able to support the weight capacity. It can bear 1,000 kg per square meter while ordinary apartment roofs only can hold 100 kg per square meter”, Professor Li told CCTV News. Source: CCTV NEWS via Inhabitat.com
In addition to providing fresh organic vegetables and fruits, the Pujia Primary School rooftop farm also serves as a layer of insulation that regulates temperatures and keeps the building cool in the summers and warm in winters.
Climate control. In addition to providing fresh organic vegetables and fruits, the Pujia Primary School rooftop farm also serves as a layer of insulation that regulates temperatures and keeps the building cool in the summers and warm in winters. Source: CCTV NEWS via Inhabitat.com
Due to a lack of extra land, the teachers and pupils grow vegetables, such as tomatoes, potatoes and cucumbers on the roof of the school building to help students get closer to nature according to one the school's teachers. Image of the rooftop garden in 2014. (Photo / Li Jiangang)
Various vegetables are grown on the roof of Pujia Primary School in Hangzhou, east China’s Zhejiang province. Due to a lack of extra land, the teachers and pupils grow vegetables, such as tomatoes, potatoes and cucumbers on the roof of the school building to help students get closer to nature according to one the school’s teachers. Image of the rooftop garden in 2014. (Photo / Li Jiangang) Source: CCTV NEWS via Inhabitat.com
Countries such as France, Switzerland, and Canada have all passed laws regulating and demanding that all new commercial and residential buildings have at least a partly green rooftop.
Green roofs are on the up! Countries such as France, Switzerland, and Canada have all passed laws regulating and demanding that all new commercial and residential buildings have at least a partly green rooftop. Source: ECNS.cn
But beyond their decorative benefits, there are many other impressive and important advantages to building rooftop gardens, such as improved air quality, effective use of rainwater, urban heat island (UHI) effect control, energy efficiency, noise reduction, and the introduction of additional urban habitat for wildlife.
Rooftop gardens look good, have a great view, and provide a smart and quick way to enjoy a quiet retreat in the heart of the city. But beyond their decorative benefits, there are many other impressive and important advantages to building rooftop gardens, such as improved air quality, effective use of rainwater, urban heat island (UHI) effect control, energy efficiency, noise reduction, and the introduction of additional urban habitat for wildlife. Source: ECNS.cn
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