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Little Free Libraries are making a BIG difference, spreading the joy of reading

2 min read

Better Society
Little Free Libraries are making a BIG difference, spreading the joy of reading
Source: Little Free Library

Little Free Library is a nonprofit organisation that inspires a love of reading, builds community, and sparks creativity by fostering neighbourhood book exchanges around the world.

Little Free Libraries: Building Community & Spreading Literacy

There are now more than 50,000+ registered Little Free Libraries, covering all 50 states of America and some 70+ countries worldwide. Through Little Free Libraries, millions of books are exchanged each year, massively increasing access to books for readers of all ages and backgrounds. The Little Free Library nonprofit is based in Hudson, Wisconsin, United States.

Leave a book to take a book Micro-libraries encourage reading while updating unappreciated public spaces. These pop-up collections don’t require library cards or charge fees. Generally, there’s only one rule: leave a book to take a book. Source: Facebook/BrightVibes

Micro-libraries encourage reading while updating unappreciated public spaces.

Thousands of book lovers around the world are joining the “Little Free Library Movement.” While public libraries allow us to share information and stories within our community, “little libraries” create a new sense of wonder and an intimate reading experience in this digital age.

Recent budget cuts in many countries have been threatening public libraries. Many people mistakenly consider them as “nostalgic institutions” only. Fortunately, e-publications and e-readers have sparked a renewed interest in books, both digital and print. People are capitalising on this fresh energy with a new trend of pop-up libraries.

Micro-libraries encourage reading while updating unappreciated public spaces. These pop-up collections don’t require library cards or charge fees. Generally, there’s only one rule: leave a book to take a book. There’s usually a librarian of sorts to tend to the collection.

This literary trend prospers because of activists like Wisconsin’s Todd Bol. When his mother, a devoted book lover, passed away, he decided to honor her memory. He set up a dollhouse-sized library on his lawn so he could share books with others, and this was the beginning of Little Free Library in 2009. According to the organisation, some 50,000+ Little Free Libraries have been registered on more than 70 countries around the world. See their Facebbok page here.

Check out some of the many of the inventive and imaginative Little Free Library designs on Pinterest, like the TARDIS pictured below, the former fridge below that, and a take a tour of  The Little Free Library Headquarters at the very bottom.

Source: MindfulLivingNetwork Main Image: Facebook/LittleFreeLibrary

Some are built like dollhouses, birdhouses, barns, phone booths, and yes, even TARDISes too!
From Ghana and The Congo to Pakistan and The Netherlands, Little Free Libraries are appearing everywhere Some are built like dollhouses, birdhouses, barns, phone booths, and yes, even TARDISes too! Source: BookRiot/KarenBNelson
The Little Libraries come in many shapes and disguises, but the principle remains the same.
Use your imagination The Little Libraries come in many shapes and disguises, but the principle remains the same. Source: Pinterest/LittleLibrary

A visit to Little Free Library Headquarters… One of the most successful ways to improve the reading achievement of children is to increase their access to books, especially at home. Source: Youtube/LittleFreeLibrary
Make an Impact

How to start your own little library in your community

A 'novel' way to share books in your neighbourhood – all it takes is a box, a few paperbacks and some serious waterproofing. Mini-library enthusiasts enjoy exchanging books, getting to know their neighbours – and pruning their book collections. Why wait for one to pop up near you when you could start your own? Here's how...