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Grandma and Granddaughter Charm Neighbourhood With Enchanting Fairy House Tours

Source: GoodNewsNetwork

On a leafy suburban New York state street, a tiny mailbox next to a tree that holds a listing of each little house and its name, and the Fairy House Tour begins…

Pop up fairy village in New York charms neighbourhood

A New York grandmother-granddaughter team have been building little fairy houses as a hobby for years, reported the GoodNewsNetwork last week. However, when COVID-19 hit they got extra busy creating little magical vignettes they could place outside for their local community to explore and enjoy.

A tiny mailbox next to a tree holds a listing of each little house and its name—14 all together. An arrow points the way to a lovely flower-filled garden where the houses are nestled in between greenery and colourful blooms.
The fairy tour begins on a New York state street. A tiny mailbox next to a tree holds a listing of each little house and its name—14 all together. An arrow points the way to a lovely flower-filled garden where the houses are nestled in between greenery and colourful blooms. Source: GoodNewsNetwork
a round mosaic house with a bright pink door and jewels that sparkle in the sun. It’s made out of a tin can, plaster of Paris, old buttons, glitter, and beads. “We love to use things that can be recycled, and other found objects, like old buttons” says the grandmother Carol. “We especially enjoy making the pathways. We just use plaster from the hardware store and inset all types of things from pebbles to glitter and plastic jewels.”
The first stop on the Finger Lakes tour is ‘Bernie’s Buttons’: a round mosaic house with a bright pink door and jewels that sparkle in the sun. It’s made out of a tin can, plaster of Paris, old buttons, glitter, and beads. “We love to use things that can be recycled, and other found objects, like old buttons” says the grandmother Carol. “We especially enjoy making the pathways. We just use plaster from the hardware store and inset all types of things from pebbles to glitter and plastic jewels.” Source: GoodNewsNetwork
A huge crystal ball glows with mysterious powers. A tiny handmade sign says ‘Welcome’ and a decorative wire bench invites tired fairies to sit for a spell.
Next stop is ‘Finley’s Shanty’, where an old stone pathway welcomes visiting fairies to enter via the round wooden door. A huge crystal ball glows with mysterious powers. A tiny handmade sign says ‘Welcome’ and a decorative wire bench invites tired fairies to sit for a spell. Source: GoodNewsNetwork

Each tiny house is unique

After lunch the fairies can head over to ‘Flo’s Creek’ to sit under the gazebo and read or collect pink petunias.

‘Aqua’s Flip Flop Inn’, looks very inviting for a swim, boat ride, or just for relaxing in the sun and sand.

The Inn has a turquoise roof imbedded with shells, a rainbow door, and a one-inch tall sandcastle. A sparking boulder painted with a mandala pattern sits to the left of the door and a crystal covered rock to the right.

Each teeny-tiny house has a special feel about it: They’re certainly places any fairy would love to live. Hidden under bushes and burrowed at the bases of huge trees, surrounded by the smell of showy flowers and the gurgling of a waterfall, the settings couldn’t be more enchanting.

This fairy land has been put away for the upcoming winter for now, but you can still take the full guided tour through the video below.

Source: GoodNewsNetwork 

“The fairies can sit by the waterfall and sneak into my grandma’s garden to steal fresh raspberries”, according to the granddaughter. “They can also play tic tac bug.”
Where do the fairies go for lunch? ‘Beans Pod’. “The fairies can sit by the waterfall and sneak into my grandma’s garden to steal fresh raspberries”, according to the granddaughter. “They can also play tic tac bug.” Source: GoodNewsNetwork
“Well, I hope you enjoyed your fairy garden tour”, say the words on the sign, “because I really enjoyed it so much. Please take a jewel to remember your visit.”
At the end of the tour sits a three-inch tall treasure chest filled with colourful jewels. “Well, I hope you enjoyed your fairy garden tour”, say the words on the sign, “because I really enjoyed it so much. Please take a jewel to remember your visit.” Source: GoodNewsNetwork

Fairy Garden Virtual Tour in HF On a leafy suburban New York state street, a tiny mailbox next to a tree that holds a listing of each little house and its name, and the Fairy House Tour begins… Source: YouTube/Rebecca Wong
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DISCOVER WHY GRANDPARENTS WHO BABYSIT THEIR GRANDKIDS 'TEND TO LIVE LONGER’

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