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Floating islands introduce a novel type of public space to Copenhagen

Source: MIR/MarshallBlecher

Mobile, floating and free for public use, the Copenhagen Islands concept was created as a way to revitalise the city’s old harbour while introducing green space for the benefit of local residents, flora and fauna.

Copenhagen plans “parkipelago” of floating islands

Plans have been unveiled for a new type of public space in the heart of Copenhagen: a “parkipelago” of floating islands. Dubbed the Copenhagen Islands, this non-profit initiative follows the success of CPH-Ø1, the first prototype island that launched in 2018 and was anchored in various parts of the city harbour. Copenhagen Islands plans to launch three more human-made islands in 2020, with more slated for the future.

Endemic plants, trees and grasses will grow atop the island to provide habitat for birds and insects, while the space below each island is ideal for seaweed, fish and molluscs.
The islands will serve as platforms for different activities ranging from swim zones and floating saunas to gardens and a sail-in cafe. Endemic plants, trees and grasses will grow atop the island to provide habitat for birds and insects, while the space below each island is ideal for seaweed, fish and molluscs. Source: copenhagenislands.com

“The islands reintroduce wilderness and whimsy to the rapidly gentrifying harbour

Mobile, floating and free for public use, the Copenhagen Islands concept was created as a way to revitalise the forgotten parts of the city’s old harbour while introducing green space for the benefit of local residents, flora and fauna. 

The “parkipelago” idea is the collaboration of Australian architect Marshall Blecher and Danish design studio Fokstrot

Dubbed the Copenhagen Islands, this non-profit initiative follows the success of CPH-Ø1, the first prototype island that launched in 2018 and was anchored in various parts of the city harbor. Copenhagen Islands plans to launch three more human-made islands in 2020, with more planned in the future.

The islands reintroduce wilderness and whimsy to the rapidly gentrifying harbour and offer a constantly changing, generous green space in the center of the city,” the architects explained. “The project also hints at a new type of climate resilient urbanism, inherently flexible in its use and only using sustainably sourced and recycled materials.” 

Copenhagen Islands has received the Taipei International Design Awards for Public Space as well as the award for Social Design.

Images by MIR via Marshall Blecher

Source: Inhabitat 

CPH-Ø1 will be joined by CPH-Ø2, Ø3 and many more. They will serve as platforms for different activities - swim zones, floating saunas, floating gardens, floating mussel farms and a floating sail-in café, all free to be explored by the increasing number of kayaks, sailors, GoBoaters, tourists and fishermen in the harbour.
FLOATING FEATURES: CPH-Ø1 will be joined by CPH-Ø2, Ø3 and many more. They will serve as platforms for different activities – swim zones, floating saunas, floating gardens, floating mussel farms and a floating sail-in café, all free to be explored by the increasing number of kayaks, sailors, GoBoaters, tourists and fishermen in the harbour. Source: MarshallBlecher/Inhabitat
The project is a collaboration between Australian architect Marshall Blecher and Danish design studio Fokstrot
Modular, mobile islands to revitalise harbour The project is a collaboration between Australian architect Marshall Blecher and Danish design studio Fokstrot Source: marshallblecher
The project also hints at a new type of climate resilient urbanism, inherently flexible in its use and only using sustainably sourced and recycled materials.
Copenhagen Islands has received the Taipei International Design Awards for Public Space as well as the award for Social Design. The project also hints at a new type of climate resilient urbanism, inherently flexible in its use and only using sustainably sourced and recycled materials. Source: MarshallBlecher/Inhabitat
Like the CPH-Ø1 prototype, which was a 20-square-meter timber platform with a linden tree at the center, all Copenhagen Islands will be constructed by hand using traditional techniques in the boat-building yards in the city’s south harbour.
CPH-Ø1 prototype debuted in 2018. Like the CPH-Ø1 prototype, which was a 20-square-meter timber platform with a linden tree at the center, all Copenhagen Islands will be constructed by hand using traditional techniques in the boat-building yards in the city’s south harbour. Source: MarshallBlecher/Inhabitat
They offer a constantly changing, generous green space in the center of the city,
The islands reintroduce wilderness and whimsy to the rapidly gentrifying harbour. They offer a constantly changing, generous green space in the center of the city, Source: None
The islands can be moved seasonally between under-utilised and newly developed parts of the harbor to help catalyse urban growth.
In winter, the islands can be joined together to create a “super continent” for special events or festivals. The islands can be moved seasonally between under-utilised and newly developed parts of the harbor to help catalyse urban growth. Source: marshallblecher.com
Mobile, floating and free for public use, the Copenhagen Islands concept was created as a way to revitalise the forgotten parts of the city’s old harbour while introducing green space for the benefit of local residents, flora and fauna.
The “parkipelago” of floating public spaces has been dubbed the Copenhagen Islands Mobile, floating and free for public use, the Copenhagen Islands concept was created as a way to revitalise the forgotten parts of the city’s old harbour while introducing green space for the benefit of local residents, flora and fauna. Source: marshallblecher
In a push to bring more clean energy to the city of Copenhagen, the Danish government has announced plans to build nine new artificial islands as part of what will become the largest and most ambitious land reclamation project in Scandinavia. Set to begin construction in 2022, the project, dubbed Holmene (the Islets), will comprise 3 million square meters of land and will be located just 10 kilometers south of Copenhagen. For more on this story, click ?
In a separate manmade island project, Copenhagen plans one of northern Europe is largest, greenest and most innovative business districts. In a push to bring more clean energy to the city of Copenhagen, the Danish government has announced plans to build nine new artificial islands as part of what will become the largest and most ambitious land reclamation project in Scandinavia. Set to begin construction in 2022, the project, dubbed Holmene (the Islets), will comprise 3 million square meters of land and will be located just 10 kilometers south of Copenhagen. For more on this story, click ? Source: Holmene/BrightVibes
So what is Recycled Park, how does it work? The basic principle is that plastic waste materials are collected or ‘harvested’ from the river and quays. Consequently, from these waste materials reusable plastics are separated and recycled into building blocks which are the base material for a floating park.
Meanwhile Rotterdam’s Floating Park is Made From Recycled Plastic Waste Found in the Maas River So what is Recycled Park, how does it work? The basic principle is that plastic waste materials are collected or ‘harvested’ from the river and quays. Consequently, from these waste materials reusable plastics are separated and recycled into building blocks which are the base material for a floating park. Source: rotterdammakeithappen.no

FUTURE ISLANDS Copenhagen Islands are one of many parkipelagos yet to be built. Several harbors all over Denmark have undergone huge development, changing rapidly as cities are expanding and sea levels are rising. Preparing for the future, the islands can be adapted and customized to each harbor, creating a unique and site-specific urban environment. Source: Vimeo/CopenhagenIslands
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Here are some low-budget, easy tips (beyond the ordinary) on how to decrease your carbon footprint. Also included are how these steps will help you, the environment, and those of us who need to live in it. Let’s be more like Copenhagen