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Amsterdam is planting mini-gardens around trash cans with hopes to cut littering

Amsterdam is planting mini-gardens around trash cans with hopes to cut littering
Source: Instagram/containertuintjes

After an initial experiment with artificial grass at trial locations reduced litter by half, these miniature gardens installed around underground waste bins in Amsterdam are 3D printed with plastic waste, so a place for trash gets upgraded using trash. How cool is that?

Amsterdam plants mini-gardens around trash cans to cut littering

Miniature gardens are springing up around street bins in Amsterdam in an experiment to see whether they will dissuade people from thoughtlessly littering near them. The trial is to be conducted at 17 sites over the next three months, after an earlier experiment using artificial grass at the base of 150 bins was a partial success, reducing the dumping of rubbish in the immediate vicinity by around half; however, the plastic turf soon became unsightly.

A council official told The Guardian it was hoped that the presence of foliage and flowers would act as a “kind of moral appeal” to potential litterers and give a lift to the appearance of Amsterdam’s streets. The main concern for council officials conducting the trail is whether the gardens prove to be an obstacle to teams collecting the rubbish. — The Guardian | Quest.nl

Residents were also found to be fearful of touching the bins due to the coronavirus, and there was a higher level of absenteeism among rubbish collectors, meaning street bins were often left full.

The problem of litter around public bins has come to the fore during the lockdown as people working from home have ordered more takeaways, increasing the amount of bulky waste. Residents were also found to be fearful of touching the bins due to the coronavirus, and there was a higher level of absenteeism among rubbish collectors, meaning street bins were often left full. Source: Instagram/containertuintjes

It not only enters nature, but also attracts rats and gulls (also animals, but not the most popular). And as soon as one bag is dumped next to a container, other people follow suit. The plants prevent this. Waste dumping on top of flowers for many people is just a step too far.
Street litter is a major problem in many cities. It not only enters nature, but also attracts rats and gulls (also animals, but not the most popular). And as soon as one bag is dumped next to a container, other people follow suit. The plants prevent this. Waste dumping on top of flowers for many people is just a step too far. Source: Instagram/containertuintjes
The municipality had to contract two private companies to remove the extra bulky waste, and council officials complained in the media last month about the attitude of Amsterdammers to their streets.
The street bins in Amsterdam are used both for general litter and by residents for their rubbish bags. The municipality had to contract two private companies to remove the extra bulky waste, and council officials complained in the media last month about the attitude of Amsterdammers to their streets. Source: Instagram/containertuintjes
So far, the results seem positive and littering around the bins has fallen.
The mini-gardens are affixed to the bins so they can’t come adrift or get stolen. So far, the results seem positive and littering around the bins has fallen. Source: Instagram/containertuintjes
According to ecologist Menno Schilthuizen of Naturalis.
With an area of ​​just two square meters, how much difference can one of these mini-gardens make? According to ecologist Menno Schilthuizen of Naturalis. “Dumpster platforms are a free surface where nothing lives at this time. The more we can cover it with plants of the city, the better, “he says. Especially flying insects, such as butterflies and bees benefit from Container gardens. These services can cover relatively large distances. The gardens together with city parks, lawns and other planters a network of green. “For mobile species, even a tiny tuft of vegetation is already expanding the habitat,” explains Schilthuizen. Source: Instagram/containertuintjes
Mini-container-gardens makes cities green The brilliant ?? Dutch ‘mini-container-gardens’ ? turn trash containers into green ‘oasis’. They stop people from littering, and the bees ? love them too. ? CityGard Source: Facebook/BrightVibes
Make an Impact

PICKING UP LITTER MADE FUN AND EASY WITH A WALKING STICK

Check out this idea, again from Amsterdam, to make picking up litter quick and fun and something you can do alone or in groups.