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Watch as this colour-blind boy sees the full spectrum of colours for the very first time

2 min read

Better Society
Watch as this colour-blind boy sees the full spectrum of colours for the very first time
Source: None

This Iowa boy was born colour-blind, but a special pair of glasses has changed his life forever.

See the difference?

Carson Irlbeck is 10 years old and experiences colour-blindness, or deuteranopia. Watch this touching moment when he tries on his new  glasses and experiences the full spectrum of colour for the first time.

Colour-blindness affects 1 in 12 men and 1 in 200 women Colour-blindness, or colour vision deficiency, is a condition where a person’s eyes are unable to see colours under normal light. People with colour-blindness have a hard time telling colours apart from each other. Source: Facebook/NowThisNews

What is colour-blindness and who is affected?

Colour-blindness affects millions of people worldwide. It affects 1 in 12 men and 1 in 200 women. The condition ranges from a variety of classes, red-green colour-blindness being the most common. Most people who suffer from colour-blindness are not blind to colour, but have a reduced ability to see them. Colour-blindness is also called Colour Vision Deficiency (CVD).

This is where Berkley-based company Enchroma’s technology helps: a marriage of colour vision science and optical technology. Specialty eyewear that alleviates red-green colour-blindness, enhancing colours without the compromise of colour accuracy.

Source: Enchroma

A person with red-green colour-blindness sees the world differently. Their red and green photopigments have more overlap than normal, making them unable to see certain colours. This Ishihara test simulates how colours may appear to a colourblind person.
Source: Youtube/CNBC
How colours appear to many with colour-blindness, or deuteranopia A person with red-green colour-blindness sees the world differently. Their red and green photopigments have more overlap than normal, making them unable to see certain colours. This Ishihara test simulates how colours may appear to a colourblind person.
Source: Youtube/CNBC Source: Enchroma

The glasses that ‘fix’ colour-blindness

In the following video, chief scientist at Enchroma, Don McPherson, explains more about the glasses and we witness people wearing them for the first time.

People see in full colour for the first time with glasses that ‘fix’ colour colour-blindness Watch as people try the Enchroma corrective glasses for the first time. Chief scientist, Don McPherson explains more about the glasses. Source: Youtube/CNBC
Grandpa sees the full colour spectrum for the first time Here we see another recipient of the classes witness the full colour spectrum for the first time, and the experience is clearly an emotional one. Source: Facebook/ViralThread
Make an Impact

Take the colour-blindness test:

If this has made you wonder about your own vision and you are uncertain, take the free colour-blindness test now!