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Not one but two Indian families have built spacious homes around large old fruit trees

6 min read

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Not one but two Indian families have built spacious homes around large old fruit trees
Source: TheBetterIndia.com

In Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat respectively, a 150-yo fig tree and an 80-yo mango tree have become literal centrepieces of family homes, as each building was thoughtfully constructed upwards and around the old fruit trees, causing them no harm nor restricting their future growth.

These Treehouses are ideal for Indian families who wanted to branch out

When one family in Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, decided to branch out and expand their family home, they came up with a novel way of dealing with an ancient giant fig tree in their garden – they built the house around it. Meanwhile, in Chitrakoot, Udaipur (Rajasthan), a massive four-storey house around an 80-year-old mango tree has become the focal point of local tourists who are queuing up to get a glimpse of it. 

Branches of a peepal tree (sacred fig tree) protrude from the Kesharwani family’s home in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. “We believe that 350 million gods and goddesses reside in one peepal tree. The tree is also mentioned in the Geeta,” a Hindu religious text, said Kesharwani. (AFP Photo/Uma Shankar MISHRA) Source: AFP/yahoo!news

Madhya Pradesh family branches out with novel tree house

When the Kesharwanis decided to branch out and expand their family home, they came up with a novel way of dealing with an ancient giant fig tree in their garden — they built the house around it.

Now the thick trunk of the 150-year-old tree is the central feature of their residence, growing through the middle of the building in the city of Jabalpur.

"We are nature lovers and my father insisted that we keep the tree," said Yogesh Kesharwani, whose parent built the house in 1994 with the help of an engineer friend.

"The tree is some 150 years old. We knew it was easy to cut the tree but difficult to grow one like it," he told AFP in 2019. 

Source: AFP/yahoo!news

His wife can pray without having to leave home, sitting before the tree in the mornings. The family also wanted to send the message that people can put down roots in the middle of nature without destroying anything. (AFP Photo/Uma Shankar MISHRA)
Yogesh Kesharwani stands on the first floor of their home in Jabalpur, built around a fig tree. His wife can pray without having to leave home, sitting before the tree in the mornings. The family also wanted to send the message that people can put down roots in the middle of nature without destroying anything. (AFP Photo/Uma Shankar MISHRA) Source: AFP/yahoo!news
The four-storey building is a local landmark because of its unique facade. Leafy branches jut out from the windows, dwarfing the building and prompting curious looks from passersby. (AFP Photo/Uma Shankar MISHRA)
The fig tree, known as peepal in Hindi, is one of the most worshipped trees in India and cutting it down is considered inauspicious by many. The four-storey building is a local landmark because of its unique facade. Leafy branches jut out from the windows, dwarfing the building and prompting curious looks from passersby. (AFP Photo/Uma Shankar MISHRA) Source: AFP/yahoo!news
The tree has never caused any practical problems to the family, insisted Kesharwani.
Neelu Kesharwani, daughter-in-law of Moti Lal Kesharwani who built their house around a tree, performs a ritual on the second floor. The tree has never caused any practical problems to the family, insisted Kesharwani. “We don’t even realise that the tree exists because it doesn’t come in our way. It just stands there silently.” (AFP Photo/Uma Shankar MISHRA) Source: AFP/yahoo!news

Not A Single Branch Was Cut To Build This Three-Storey House On A 40-Foot Mango Tree

This next three-storey treehouse has two bedrooms, a kitchen, a library and a living area, and is located in Udaipur. “The area where our treehouse stands is known for its fruit trees. People used to sell these fruits from over 4,000 trees for a living. But due to an increase in population, they started cutting the trees down,” owner Kul Pradeep Singh told TheBetterIndia 

To make sure that no tree was cut down to build his dream home, Udaipur businessman Kul Pradeep Singh built a home around a 40-foot mango tree.
Not A Single Branch Was Cut To Build This Three-Storey House On A 40-Foot Mango Tree. To make sure that no tree was cut down to build his dream home, Udaipur businessman Kul Pradeep Singh built a home around a 40-foot mango tree. Source: TheBetterIndia
It stands nine feet above the ground and is supported by a tree trunk. The entire structure is made of steel and the walls and floors of the house are made of cellulose sheet as well as fibre. Four pillars are placed around the tree, which act as an electric conductor during lightning.
The construction of Singh’s house was completed in one year with the help of an architect. The tree was around 20-feet-tall at the time, and the house was built with two floors. It stands nine feet above the ground and is supported by a tree trunk. The entire structure is made of steel and the walls and floors of the house are made of cellulose sheet as well as fibre. Four pillars are placed around the tree, which act as an electric conductor during lightning. Source: TheBetterIndia
— “Birds and small animals who dwell in the tree are now our family members. To co-exist with other living beings is an absolute pleasure, and we love their company,” says Singh, who worked in the electricity department for about eight years before starting his own company.
“You can see branches inside our kitchen and bedroom. We make necessary changes in the structure according to the growth of the tree.” — “Birds and small animals who dwell in the tree are now our family members. To co-exist with other living beings is an absolute pleasure, and we love their company,” says Singh, who worked in the electricity department for about eight years before starting his own company. Source: CatersNews/StoryTrender
The former government employee and an environmental conservationist, Singh was drawn to the idea of building a tree house after inspired from his favourite Indian comic character Betaal. Engineer builds beautiful four-storey house on mango tree without disrupting its growth.
Conceptualised in June 1991, the house designed by civil engineer Kul Pradeep Singh was built within six months. The former government employee and an environmental conservationist, Singh was drawn to the idea of building a tree house after inspired from his favourite Indian comic character Betaal. Engineer builds beautiful four-storey house on mango tree without disrupting its growth. Source: CatersNews/StoryTrender
Singh says his wife and son enjoy their lives in their house, and that they are rewarded by the tree with fresh mangoes every summer.
The mango tree has grown from 20 feet to 40 feet within 11 years. Singh’s house, which earlier had two floors, now stands tall with three. Singh says his wife and son enjoy their lives in their house, and that they are rewarded by the tree with fresh mangoes every summer. Source: CatersNews/StoryTrender
The couple had to move out of the house for work in a different city. But the Singh’s say they always look for an opportunity to stay at the house. “I now enjoy retreat at the tree house with my extended family and friends.”Engineer builds beautiful four-storey house on mango tree without disrupting its growth.
Singh and his wife Karan Lata Singh, lived in the house for five years. The couple had to move out of the house for work in a different city. But the Singh’s say they always look for an opportunity to stay at the house. “I now enjoy retreat at the tree house with my extended family and friends.”Engineer builds beautiful four-storey house on mango tree without disrupting its growth. Source: CatersNews/StoryTrender
Engineer builds beautiful four-storey house on mango tree without disrupting its growth.
Without disturbing and damaging any branch of the tree, Mr Singh built the house on two principals — aerodynamics and synchronisation of the movement of the branch. Engineer builds beautiful four-storey house on mango tree without disrupting its growth. Source: CatersNews/StoryTrender
The design is such that when a branch moves with wind, the walls also move.”Engineer builds beautiful four-storey house on mango tree without disrupting its growth.
Singh explains: “The house is built of only steel and cellulose sheets. The design is such that when a branch moves with wind, the walls also move.”Engineer builds beautiful four-storey house on mango tree without disrupting its growth. Source: CatersNews/StoryTrender
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