Skip to content

You are using an outdated browser

Internet Explorer is not supported by this site and Microsfot has stopped releasing updates, therefore you may encounter issues whilst visiting this site and we strongly recommend that you upgrade your browser for modern web functionality, a better user experience and improved security.

Upgrade my browser

HOW DOLLS CONTRIBUTE TO A HEALTHY BODY IMAGE

3 min read

Better Society
HOW DOLLS CONTRIBUTE TO A HEALTHY BODY IMAGE
Source: Facebook/Lammily

The Lammily range of dolls and accessories was designed for children aged 3-11, but has been proven to be wildly entertaining for ages 4-72!

“What if Fashion Dolls Were Simply Made Using Standard Human Body Proportions?”

“What if Fashion Dolls Were Simply Made Using Standard Human Body Proportions?” This is the question Lammily founder Nickolay Lamm asked after shopping for a doll for his niece in 2013. He thought to himself, “Surely they have the technology to do it, it can’t be that hard!” Lamm Googled what a realistic Barbie would look like and did not find anything. So, using 3D printing and Photoshop, he made a digital prototype of a doll based on the proportions of an average 19 year old American woman.

These dolls actually contribute to a healthy body image The Lammily range of dolls and accessories reflect diversity and help children identify with their action figures. Lammily Marks are a set of reusable sticker accessories for fashion dolls, allowing them to have stretch marks, cellulite, moles, etc., just like real people do. Source: Facebook/BrightVibes

A male doll with average proportions and a doll-sized wheelchair accessory are a market first

Soon, Lamm was getting emails from moms and grandparents asking, “Where can we get a doll like this?”. But he had to tell them that it doesn’t exist because the doll they saw was just a Photoshopped image, it wasn’t a real doll yet. 

So, on March 5, 2014 Nikolay Lamm launched a crowdfunding campaign to make dolls with typical human body proportions a reality. More than 13,621 backers, preordered over 19,000 dolls. The crowdfunding was covered by HuffingtonPost, Time, USA Today, Upworthy, and more. After months of production and design, the first Lammily doll was ready to be released…

On November 19, 2014 the Lammily line of dolls went on sale and shipping to all backers began as well. At that time, Lammily also released Lammily Marks, a set of reusable sticker accessories for fashion dolls, allowing them to have stretch marks, cellulite, moles, etc., just like you see on real human skin.

Lammily also released a video (below) of second-graders reacting to Lammily vs Barbie, which was featured on CNN, BuzzFeed, ABC, and many other media outlets. This launch generated so much media attention, that, according to Time, it influenced Mattel to release Curvy, Tall, and Petite Barbie in 2016. 

Since Lammily launched in 2014, they have continued to expand the Lammily line of dolls…Photographer Lammily, their second doll, was launched on September 22, 2015. Enough of their customers preordered her, which allowed the company to begin full-scale production.

Animal Rescuer Lammily, the first male fashion doll with average proportions, was launched via a crowdfunding campaign on March 5, 2016.

Lammily Wheelchair, the only fashion doll sized wheelchair on the market, Kickstartered into production on December 2016, and went on general sale in the summer of 2017.

Source: Lammily.com

The appearance of Lammily dolls on the market may have prompted Mattel to broaden their range Second-graders react to Lammily vs Barbie, which was featured on CNN, BuzzFeed, ABC, and many other media outlets. This launch generated so much media attention, that, according to Time, it influenced Mattel to release Curvy, Tall, and Petite Barbie in 2016. Source: Youtube/Lammily
With differing body shapes, adhesive marks similar to those found on real human skin, and accessories like the hugely popular wheelchair, more and more children can identify with the toys they play with every day.
Who can identify with the unrealistic body shapes of many dolls on the market? With differing body shapes, adhesive marks similar to those found on real human skin, and accessories like the hugely popular wheelchair, more and more children can identify with the toys they play with every day. Source: Facebook/Lammily

Boy Lammily

The existence of toys which provide positive, relatable body image is inarguably paramount to girls and women, but let us not forget that societal pressures concerning body image apply to boys and men as well.

Lammily decided it was high  time to take the next logical step and create the world’s first realistically proportioned doll for boys!

The new Lammily doll is created according to the proportions of the average 19-year-old man. Anthropometric data came from Dr. Reed from the University of Michigan. See below how Boy Lammily compares to Ken doll.

He may not have a six-pack, say the makers, but he has a fantastic sense of humor. He may not have the biggest biceps, but he has a big heart. He may not look like a runway model, but he values himself for who he truly is, and always makes sure to pay the same respect to others! In following with these themes, a storybook pamphlet is included with each doll illustrating his background story.

Source: Lammily.com

While he may not have a six-pack, he has a fantastic sense of humor. Though he may not have the biggest biceps, he has a big heart. So he may not look like a runway model, but he does value himself for who he truly is, and always makes sure to pay the same respect to others.
Mattel’s Ken alongside Boy Lammily While he may not have a six-pack, he has a fantastic sense of humor. Though he may not have the biggest biceps, he has a big heart. So he may not look like a runway model, but he does value himself for who he truly is, and always makes sure to pay the same respect to others. Source: Lammily.com
Make an Impact

To find out more or to order your Lammily Doll and accessories CLICK!

All Lammily dolls are made according to the the proportions of the average 19 year old American person. Everything from the body proportions, to the detailed feet and toes, to the hands which can hold objects, to the hips, is as real as possible. It extends to the dolls’ accessories, which include Lammily Marks, a reusable sticker set of pimples, mosquito bites, bruises, and more, and Period Party, which starts an open and positive conversation about periods.