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Gorillas Pose With Anti Poaching Rangers in the World’s Coolest Selfies

Gorillas Pose With Anti Poaching Rangers in the World’s Coolest Selfies
Source: Facebook/TheEliteAntiPoachingUnitsAndCombatTrackers

Anti-poaching rangers’ extraordinary selfies with two gorillas that look almost human in Congo national park quickly go viral.

Gorillas’ selfie with rangers goes viral

A photo posted by a Congolese anti-poaching ranger showing he and a colleague with two posing gorillas in the Virunga National Park, has gone viral online. What’s special about this photo is that the gorillas in the background are not just in the frame, but seem to be actually posing for the camera. However, there is a sweet but sad little story behind the picture.

Why a Park Ranger’s selfie with gorillas went viral Source: YouTube/SouthChinaMorningPost
Senkwekwe center at Virunga National Park received dozens of messages about the photo. YES, it's real! Apparently those gorilla gals are always acting cheeky so this was the perfect shot of their true personalities!
“Another day at the office…” shared Ranger Mathieu Shamavu Senkwekwe center at Virunga National Park received dozens of messages about the photo. YES, it’s real! Apparently those gorilla gals are always acting cheeky so this was the perfect shot of their true personalities! Source: Facebook/TheEliteAntiPoachingUnitsAndCombatTrackers
The park wishes to emphasise that these gorillas are in an enclosed sanctuary for orphans where they have lived since infancy. The caretakers at Senkwekwe take great care to not put the health of the gorillas at risk. These are exceptional circumstances in which the photo was taken. It is never permitted to approach a gorilla in the wild.
Orphaned gorillas Ndakazi and Ndeze photobomb their carers The park wishes to emphasise that these gorillas are in an enclosed sanctuary for orphans where they have lived since infancy. The caretakers at Senkwekwe take great care to not put the health of the gorillas at risk. These are exceptional circumstances in which the photo was taken. It is never permitted to approach a gorilla in the wild. Source: Facebook/TheEliteAntiPoachingUnitsAndCombatTrackers

Virunga National Park is home to around a third of the world’s population of wild mountain gorillas

The world population of mountain gorillas is currently estimated to be around 1000 individuals. 

In Virunga’s southern sector there are currently eight gorilla families and four solitary males which are habituated, meaning they are accustomed to the presence of humans.

The habituation process is done by researchers and Rangers who visit the gorillas on a daily basis for between two and three years until the gorillas are familiarised with humans.

Today, Virunga National Park is home to around a third of the world’s population of wild mountain gorillas, as well as four orphaned gorillas who reside in the Senkwekwe Center, the only facility in the world that cares for mountain gorillas in captivity. 

Located at park headquarters in Rumanbago, the Center’s inhabitants were each victims of poachers or animal traffickers as infants.

Abandoned by or taken from their families, the orphans are cared for by the Center’s dedicated staff. The staff’s extraordinary work would not be possible without the help of individuals and organisations from around the world who have stepped up to support conservation efforts in Virunga. 

Learn more about the Senkewekwe Center orphans and how you can support their care, or find out about the Fallen Rangers Fund, to care for the widows and children of Rangers killed in the line of duty.

Source: Virunga.org

The gorillas behaviour around their carers is relaxed and intimate because they have known them since their rescue as babies. While it’s touching to see the trust between them, it is under tragic circumstances.
The orphans have known these rangers since infancy The gorillas behaviour around their carers is relaxed and intimate because they have known them since their rescue as babies. While it’s touching to see the trust between them, it is under tragic circumstances. Source: Facebook/TheEliteAntiPoachingUnitsAndCombatTrackers
Source: Facebook/TheEliteAntiPoachingUnitsAndCombatTrackers
Bauma heads up the team of dedicated carers responsible for looking after the Center’s orphaned mountain gorillas.
Andre Bauma is the manager of the Senkwekwe Center Bauma heads up the team of dedicated carers responsible for looking after the Center’s orphaned mountain gorillas. Source: Virunga.org/LuAnneCadd
Self-portrait of a female Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra) in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, who had picked up photographer David Slater's camera and photographed herself with it. The “Monkey selfie copyright dispute” raged on for years to decide who own the copyright to the image; the photographer who owned the camera, or the macaque who took the selfie.
And finally…in other primate selfie news Self-portrait of a female Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra) in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, who had picked up photographer David Slater’s camera and photographed herself with it. The “Monkey selfie copyright dispute” raged on for years to decide who own the copyright to the image; the photographer who owned the camera, or the macaque who took the selfie. Source: PublicDomain
Kissed By A Wild Mountain Gorilla (Selfie) May 2015 VR Gorilla traveled to Uganda to create the first virtual reality safari experience in collaboration with a Dutch/Ugandan touring agency, Matoke Tours. During one of the 360 recordings, a young gorilla, of about 3 years old, grabbed the camera and, inquisitive as he was, started to investigate the device for several minutes. All this time the camera was left rolling. This resulted in incredible never before seen footage Source: YouTube/VRGorilla
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