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Bali’s biggest beach cleanup 2021 received more sign ups than ever

Bali’s biggest beach cleanup 2021 received more sign ups than ever
Source: Instagram/savingoceansnow

In the last four years, a community-led movement has gathered 57,500 people in 430 locations on Bali and prevented 155 tons of plastic from entering the ocean. This year, despite the ongoing lockdown and new government regulations, has seen even more volunteers get involved than usual.

Bali’s biggest beach clean up a success despite Covid restrictions

On 21st February 2021, One Island One Voice hosted the fifth annual Bali’s Biggest Clean Up. However this year, due to the pandemic and ongoing lockdown and new government regulations, organisers opted to make it a hybrid event; a combination of online sessions and individual cleanups adhering carefully to the COVID-19 restrictions. 

One Island One Voice asked participants to wear a mask and bring their own gloves, water bottle and sunscreen/hat — and of course to observe social distancing.
Organisers encouraged individual and more intimate clean ups this year of a maximum of 25 people, following the government’s request. One Island One Voice asked participants to wear a mask and bring their own gloves, water bottle and sunscreen/hat — and of course to observe social distancing. Source: Instagram/beehavewaxwraps
However, organisers still asked participants to post pictures of their cleanups and selfies with the trash they collected and also, significantly, the brands generating the waste.
With this years Bali’s Biggest Clean Up, given the above circumstances, you may not see the massive crowds on photos as in previous cleanups. However, organisers still asked participants to post pictures of their cleanups and selfies with the trash they collected and also, significantly, the brands generating the waste. Source: Instagram/byebyeplasticbags
Unfortunately no action can be taken as this is a private property.
Privately-owned landfill in Banjar Kedungu spills into the Tukad Yeh Bang Bang river. Unfortunately no action can be taken as this is a private property. Source: Instagram/punapitabanan
This year has seen even more volunteers get involved than usual.
Over the last four years the community-led movement has gathered 57,500 people in 430 locations on Bali and prevented 155 tons of plastic from entering the ocean This year has seen even more volunteers get involved than usual. Source: Instagram/byebyeplasticbags

Tourist hotspots overwhelmed by up to 60 tonnes of plastic rubbish every day

Bali’s beaches are being buried under a tide of plastic rubbish during every monsoon season. On Sunday 3 January, The Guardian reported that Bali’s famous beaches are being strewn by plastic rubbish in what experts say is becoming an annual event thanks to monsoon weather, poor waste management and a global marine pollution crisis. 

Authorities are struggling to keep up with the tide of rubbish washing up on beaches at Kuta, Legian and Seminyak, where about 90 tonnes of rubbish was collected over two days in January.

Wayan Puja, from the Badung area’s environment and sanitation agency, said: “We have been working really hard to clean up the beaches, however the trash keeps coming. Every day we deploy our personnel, trucks and loaders.”

He said more than 30 tonnes of rubbish was removed on Friday (1 January) from beaches in Kuta, Legian and Seminyak and the amount doubled to 60 tonnes on Saturday (2 January).

Source: TheGuardian

“Ending the day right ? #balisbiggestcleanup • Honestly, I thought no one would join this year cause of the pandemic and all that. BUT I was wrong! this year we had more sign ups than ever. We were active in 300+ locations, 788+ waste collection pick ups (thanks to partners @octopus.ina @sungaiwatch @ecobalirecycle), 200+ social media mentions and over 700 messages on the day! We’re still putting together the data of how much waste we collected (there’s a lot) but I’m just wow-ed right now. Pretty much speechless (never happens) and exhausted (gonna take a vacation soon I promise, just not yet). PROUD OF BALI for showing up for the fifth year in a row ??”
Melati Wijsen posted on Instagram: “Ending the day right ? #balisbiggestcleanup • Honestly, I thought no one would join this year cause of the pandemic and all that. BUT I was wrong! this year we had more sign ups than ever. We were active in 300+ locations, 788+ waste collection pick ups (thanks to partners @octopus.ina @sungaiwatch @ecobalirecycle), 200+ social media mentions and over 700 messages on the day! We’re still putting together the data of how much waste we collected (there’s a lot) but I’m just wow-ed right now. Pretty much speechless (never happens) and exhausted (gonna take a vacation soon I promise, just not yet). PROUD OF BALI for showing up for the fifth year in a row ??” Source: Instagram/melatiwijsen
Make an Impact

HOW TO ORGANISE A BEACH CLEAN UP (WITH PICTURES)

Trash on the beach can be unsightly, but when it washes into the ocean, it becomes life-threatening for marine wildlife and harmful to humans, too. If you're looking to make a difference, hosting a beach clean up is a great way to make the ocean safe and pleasant for both animals and people. You'll need to plan well and recruit volunteers that are just as passionate as you are, but the clean beach you see afterwards will be worth it all. —wikiHow