Source: Telegraph/DebbieWeldon/AP

5-Year-Old Boy’s Haircut To Look Like Friend Contains a Powerful message

When a white boy asked for same haircut as his black friend ‘to confuse his teacher’ the message was clear: nobody is born prejudiced, it has to be taught.

Best friends of different colours get the same haircut so teacher ‘won’t be able to tell them apart’

Two years ago, this story of schoolyard friendship went viral. Jaxon Rosebush, from Kentucky, asked his mother to shave his hair short so he could look like his friend Reddy Weldon and confuse their preschool teacher. The mother of one of the children involved says this provides proof that racial discrimination is only taught in later life.

5-Year-Old Boy’s Haircut To Look Like Friend Went Viral Five-year-old Jax Rosebush doesn’t see colour, but he does see the power of a good buzzcut! The Louisville, Kentucky, pre-kindergartener told his mom that he wanted to shave his hair really short so he could look like his good friend Reddy. And he couldn’t wait to confuse his teacher when they walked into class with the same haircut. Source: YouTube/CBS-Miami

Youngster gets his hair cut like his best friend and now he thinks they can’t be told apart

Once in a while the most powerful of life’s lessons can come from those with the least experience. This was certainly the case in 2017 when the story of two five-year-old boys from Kentucky, one white and one black, when viral. It’s a lesson in racial harmony from two innocents who have not been ‘taught’ to discriminate. 

Back in 2017, Jaxon ‘Jax’ Rosebush, a Louisville, Kentucky, pre-kindergartener told his mom, Lydia Stith Rosebush, that he wanted to shave his hair really short so he could look like his best friend Reddy Weldon. And he couldn’t wait to confuse his teacher when they walked into class with the same haircut.

Lydia was so touched by her son’s sentiment that she posted a photo of the duo on Facebook with the caption: “If this isn’t proof that hate and prejudice is something that is taught I don’t know what is. The only difference Jax sees in the two of them is their hair.” The post soon went viral and the message was clear: nobody is born prejudiced, you have to be taught.

When the best buddies, then aged 4 and 5, showed up to class on Monday morning with matching buzzcuts, their teacher played along, pretending to confuse the two. 

Source: CNN

When Lydia Rosebush told her son, Jax, that he needed to get a haircut, he had a fun idea. He'd shave his hair short to look like his friend, Reddy.
The viral post received 226k Likes and over 100k Shares When Lydia Rosebush told her son, Jax, that he needed to get a haircut, he had a fun idea. He’d shave his hair short to look like his friend, Reddy. Source: Facebook/LydiaStithRosebush

Jax got his haircut and “he really loves it,” says Lydia

Jaxon’s mom Lydia posted ‘This morning Jax and I were discussing his wild hair. I told him that he needed a haircut this weekend. He said that he wanted his head shaved really short so he could look like his friend Reddy. He said he couldn’t wait to go to school on Monday with his hair like Reddy’s so that his teacher wouldn’t be able to tell them apart. He thought it would be so hilarious to confuse his teacher with the same haircut. 

Here’s a picture of Jax and Reddy from their Christmas program. I’m sure you all see the resemblance. (Above)

If this isn’t proof that hate and prejudice is something that is taught I don’t know what is. The only difference Jax sees in the two of them is their hair.’

Jax amd Reddy believed if they had the same haircut, their teacher wouldn’t be able to tell them apart.
The boys celebrate their matching hairdos post-haircut Jax amd Reddy believed if they had the same haircut, their teacher wouldn’t be able to tell them apart. Source: YouTube/CBS-Miami

Nobody is Born a Racist: Prejudice Has to be Taught

Twenty years ago Parenting magazine did a special report on race and the family. In the introduction the report read: ‘Racists are not born, but made. Racism begins not in courts and classrooms, lending institutions and housing authorities, but in homes. Specifically in the interaction between parents and children. What exactly are parents telling their children about race these days? How are racial attitudes being formed?’

Unfortunately those questions are still as valid today as ever. Just what are we telling our children and grandchildren either in words or in actions?

Children must be “carefully taught” to hate, to distrust and to form friendships only within their own race. The teachings are often subtle and are part of our culture and our language. 

Are we careful and sensitive in the language we use? Do we only see on television stereotyping images of persons of colour? If we hear or see negative images, so do children. Even in our schools, history is often taught from the perspective of the white race. Do we help children see that countless people have been hurt and even killed due to intolerance and bigotry in the past, and this is still happening today?

Our actions will tell children what we truly believe about the issues of racism. The simple gesture of welcoming someone of another race to your neighbourhood conveys to a child that you respect those people and are glad to have them as neighbours.

Your willingness to stand against injustice in your community and nation, whether around the issues of housing, immigration, education or police activity, will send a clear message of fairness and equality to the children watching.

It is the children of all races that are being damaged and hurt by the racism, prejudice and bigotry they see and experience. 

The racism of adults should not be passed on to children. Instead we should be giving to children a sense of respect for all people and cultures; the ability to work together despite differences; and the firm belief that we are all equal.

Source: ScarrittBennett.org

How to Avoid Teaching Your Kids Prejudices: 12 Steps (With Pictures)

If you think of yourself as an open and accepting person, it can be a surprise to hear one of your kids make a racist or sexist remark. However, children can be curious about differences and simply need a way to talk about the differences. Rather than ignoring a judgmental comment, it's important to talk with your kids about prejudice against people who are different than them. Once you've listened to their questions and answered them honestly, you can encourage your children to accept other people for who they are. Click to learn more.

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