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Mesmerising footage and images of deep-sea creatures that live near the ocean floor

Mesmerising footage and images of deep-sea creatures that live near the ocean floor
Source: AlexanderSemenov/Instagram/schmidtocean

Stunning HD photos by Alexander Semenov of ‘Sea Angels’ and other weird and wonderful creatures inhabiting the deep, plus hypnotic 4K footage captured by ROV SuBastian of the breathtaking biodiversity in Australia’s Ningaloo Canyons.

The weird and wonderful creatures of The Deep

BrightVibes brings together a selection of just some of the awesome imagery from two fantastic items published recently by PetaPixel—a leading blog covering the world of photography—on the same fascinating and mysterious subject: the weird and wonderful creatures of The Deep. 

but the most newsworthy is a new specimen of Apolemia that might be the “longest animal ever recorded,” at approximately 47m (154ft) long.
Many never-before-seen animals were recorded during these dives—around 30 new species, the researchers reckon— but the most newsworthy is a new specimen of Apolemia that might be the “longest animal ever recorded,” at approximately 47m (154ft) long. Source: Instagram/schmidtocean

Alexander Semenov’s breathtaking images of ‘Sea Angels’ and Other Technicolor Creatures

Alexander Semenov is the head of the scientific diving team at the White Sea biological station of Lomonosov’s Moscow State University. But he’s also a marine biologist, and an exceptional underwater photographer. And nowhere is that more obvious than his ethereal portraits of so-called ‘Sea Angels.’

“Studying cold-water fauna is not a task for the faint-hearted, mainly because the conditions are so extreme both in and out of the water,” he told PetaPixel. 

“Long polar nights, freezing temperatures, ice-covered seas, strong currents and often harsh weather conditions mean that field work is only possible for a few months each year, and only after very rigorous technical and physical training.”

After nearly 13 years as an underwater photographer, Semenov still has no fear of “running out” of incredible subjects to shoot. Scroll down to see some of the amazing imagery he’s captured.

Source: PetaPixel

Source: AlexanderSemenov/Petapixels
Source: AlexanderSemenov/Petapixels
Source: AlexanderSemenov/Petapixels
Source: AlexanderSemenov/Petapixels
Source: AlexanderSemenov/Petapixels
Source: AlexanderSemenov/Petapixels
Source: AlexanderSemenov/Petapixels
Source: AlexanderSemenov/Petapixels
Source: AlexanderSemenov/Petapixels

Alexander Semenov

To see more of Alexander Semenov’s spectacular work or check out the documentary filmmaking, visit his personal website or check out this educational project “Aquatilis Expedition” on Instagram, YouTube, Russia’s VK social network, and Facebook.

Dives can only happen in the 40-60 minute intervals between high and low tide, because the currents are so strong that a diver who is carried away “is difficult to pull even on a rope.” All of this, and the requirement of carrying ropes everywhere you go, makes for a very frustrating shooting environment.
Going on a dive involves taking an ice drill and special saws out onto the White Sea, where they make triangle-shaped holes in the 0.5 – 1.5 meter thick surface. Dives can only happen in the 40-60 minute intervals between high and low tide, because the currents are so strong that a diver who is carried away “is difficult to pull even on a rope.” All of this, and the requirement of carrying ropes everywhere you go, makes for a very frustrating shooting environment. Source: AlexanderSemenov/Petapixels

The Illuminating Biodiversity of the Ningaloo Canyons

The Schmidt Ocean Institute recently released a stunning 4K highlight reel of footage captured during their ROV expedition to the previously unexplored Ningaloo Canyons in the Indian Ocean. Over the course of 180 hours of exploration, researchers uncovered some 30 new species, as well as “the longest animal ever recorded.” 

The video was captured by the ROV SuBastian, a robotic underwater exploration vehicle that can dive as deep as 4500m (14,750ft)—far deeper than any human could possibly dive unassisted–stay down for much longer than a human occupied vehicle, and capture 4K video while it’s down there. The footage you see is literally showing parts of the sea floor that no human had ever laid eyes on before.

Check out the Schmidt Ocean Institute website where you can watch the full ROV SuBastian live streams, read the researchers’ latest “Cruise Blog,” and explore the institute’s image gallery.

The Illuminating Biodiversity of the Ningaloo Canyons While exploring off the coast of Western Australian, the ROV SuBastian captured utterly mesmerising footage of the incredibly diverse array of deep-sea creatures that live in and around the Ningaloo Canyons, a vast area of seafloor that had otherwise been previously unexplored. Source: YouTube/SchmidtOceanInstitute
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BRIGHTVIBES OCEAN NEWS ROUNDUP

If you are a fan of the ocean, this link is for you. A roundup of all the positive ocean-related news articles we have published about what’s going on to keep the oceans a healthy environment for those who live in it, those who make a living from it, and for future generations to admire and be awed by.